The Longest Book in the World.
"A book could be a living thing."

— Walter Isaacson (source)

Can You Guess These Classic Books From Their Phantom Covers (Round 7)?

We’ve been doing our trademark book game for 6 previous rounds now (here, here, here, here, and here and here). For greenhorns, here’s how it works: we suck up all the words off the cover of a famous book, and you guess what the naked book cover is. Answers are below. How many can you get?

1.

2.

3.

4.

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Interested in sinking your teeth into some National Book Award nominees? We have reviews of all of ‘em!

housingworksbookstore:

blackballoonpublishing:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

vintageanchorbooks:

HOW LONG IT TAKES TO READ THE WORLD’S MOST POPULAR BOOKS: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/how-long-it-takes-to-read-the-worlds-most-popular-books

My brain likes this like this.

This is almost too good.

I gotta go, I have some reading to do.

(via robotobolano)

thelastparagraph9:

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

thelastparagraph9:

The Catcher in the Rye
by J.D. Salinger

(via robotobolano)

Murakami’s bizarre new novel The Strange Library reviewed.
Reclusive Deity Hasn’t Written A New Book In 2,000 Years (The Onion).
"In a world full of stories, why are so many novels boy-meets-girl-while-coming-of-age? Among the “Fiction Prompts” on the Poets & Writers website, “plot” gets four mentions; “character,” 93. Nothing against poignant descriptions […] but they are power-ups. Plot is the game."

— Nell Zink, from "Plot v. Character"

Dictionary.com’s Word of The Day

flapdoodle

\ FLAP-dood-l \  , noun;

1. Informal . nonsense; bosh.
Quotes:
Well, by-and-by the king he gets up and comes forward a little, and works himself up and slobbers out a speech, all full of tears and flapdoodle  about its being a sore trial for him and his poor brother…
Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, 1884
Could you tell anybody who’s interested that I’ve been under severe strain recently, or some such flap-doodle ? Everyone’ll think I was as tight as a tick anyway, but I suppose we might as well preserve the outward forms if we can.
Kingsley Amis, The Green Man, 1969
Origin:
Flapdoodle  came to English in the 1800s and is of uncertain origin.